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A dynamic limit order market with fast and slow traders

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  • Hoffmann, Peter

Abstract

This paper considers the role of high-frequency trading in a dynamic limit order market. Fast traders׳ ability to revise their quotes quickly after news arrivals helps to reduce the inefficiency that is rooted in the risk of being picked off, which increases trade. However, their presence induces slow traders to strategically submit limit orders with a lower execution probability, thereby reducing trade. Because speed is a source of market power, it enables fast traders to extract rents from other market participants and triggers a costly arms race that reduces social welfare. The model generates a number of testable implications concerning the effects of high-frequency trading in limit order markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoffmann, Peter, 2014. "A dynamic limit order market with fast and slow traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 156-169.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfinec:v:113:y:2014:i:1:p:156-169
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jfineco.2014.04.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sandrine Jacob Leal & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini & Giorgio Fagiolo, 2016. "Rock around the clock: An agent-based model of low- and high-frequency trading," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 49-76, March.
    2. Songzi Du & Haoxiang Zhu, 2014. "Welfare and Optimal Trading Frequency in Dynamic Double Auctions," NBER Working Papers 20588, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Tian, Xiao & Do, Binh & Duong, Huu Nhan & Kalev, Petko S., 2015. "Liquidity provision and informed trading by individual investors," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 35(PA), pages 143-162.
    4. Giovanni Cespa & Xavier Vives, 2016. "High Frequency Trading and Fragility," CESifo Working Paper Series 6279, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Brogaard, Jonathan & Hendershott, Terrence & Riordan, Ryan, 2017. "High frequency trading and the 2008 short-sale ban," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 22-42.
    6. George J. Jiang & Ingrid Lo & Giorgio Valente, 2014. "High-Frequency Trading around Macroeconomic News Announcements: Evidence from the U.S. Treasury Market," Staff Working Papers 14-56, Bank of Canada.
    7. Jonathan Brogaard & Corey Garriott & Anna Pomeranets, 2014. "High-Frequency Trading Competition," Staff Working Papers 14-19, Bank of Canada.
    8. Thierry Foucault & Roman Kozhan & Wing Wah Tham, 2017. "Toxic Arbitrage," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 1053-1094.
    9. Xuefeng Gao & Yunhan Wang, 2018. "Electronic Market Making and Latency," Papers 1806.05849, arXiv.org.
    10. Seddon, Jonathan J.J.M. & Currie, Wendy L., 2017. "A model for unpacking big data analytics in high-frequency trading," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 300-307.
    11. Nidhi Aggarwal & Susan Thomas, 2014. "The causal impact of algorithmic trading on market quality," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2014-023, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    12. Caterina Mendicino, 2014. "House prices and expectations," Research Bulletin, European Central Bank, vol. 21, pages 12-15.
    13. Paloma Lopez-Garcia & Filippo di Mauro, 2014. "Assessing competitiveness: initial results from the new compnet micro-based database," Research Bulletin, European Central Bank, vol. 21, pages 2-7.
    14. Hillert, Alexander & Maug, Ernst & Obernberger, Stefan, 2016. "Stock repurchases and liquidity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 186-209.
    15. van Kervel, V.L., 2013. "Competition between stock exchanges and optimal trading," Other publications TiSEM 5c608a0f-527d-441d-a910-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    16. Breedon, Francis & Chen, Louisa & Ranaldo, Angelo & Vause, Nicholas, 2018. "Judgement Day: algorithmic trading around the Swiss franc cap removal," Bank of England working papers 711, Bank of England.
    17. repec:eee:pacfin:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Sandrine Jacob Leal & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini & Giorgio Fagiolo, 2016. "Rock around the clock: An agent-based model of low- and high-frequency trading," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 49-76, March.
    19. repec:oup:restud:v:84:y:2017:i:4:p:1606-1651. is not listed on IDEAS
    20. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:509-521 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Serbera, Jean-Philippe & Paumard, Pascal, 2016. "The fall of high-frequency trading: A survey of competition and profits," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 271-287.
    22. Delaney, L., 2015. "An Examination of the Optimal Timing Strategy for a Slow Trader Investing in a High Frequency Trading Technology," Working Papers 15/04, Department of Economics, City University London.
    23. Lee, Kyungsub & Seo, Byoung Ki, 2017. "Marked Hawkes process modeling of price dynamics and volatility estimation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 174-200.
    24. Doojin Ryu, 2015. "Information content of inter-transaction time: A structural approach," Journal of Business Economics and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 697-711, August.
    25. Sebastian Schmidt, 2014. "Dealing with a liquidity trap when government debt matters," Research Bulletin, European Central Bank, vol. 21, pages 8-11.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    High-frequency trading; Limit order market;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games

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