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Temporary employment agencies make the world smaller:Evidence from labour mobility networks

  • Carlo Gianelle


This paper investigates how employment intermediaries affected the inter-firm network of worker mobility in an region of Italy in response of the reform that first allowed for temporary employment agencies in 1997. We map worker reallocations from a matched employer-employee dataset onto a directed graph, where vertices indicate firms, and links denote transfers of workers between firms. Using network-based methodologies we find that temporary employment agencies significantly increase network integration and practicability, while fastly increasing control over hiring channels. The policy implications of the results are discussed, highlighting the potential of network analysis as monitoring tool for regional and local labour markets.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Siena in its series Department of Economics University of Siena with number 618.

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Date of creation: Oct 2011
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Handle: RePEc:usi:wpaper:618
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  1. Sanjeev Goyal & Marco J. van der Leij & Jos� Luis Moraga-Gonzalez, 2006. "Economics: An Emerging Small World," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(2), pages 403-432, April.
  2. Susan N. Houseman, . "Why Employers Use Flexible Staffing Arrangements: Evidence from an Establishment Survey," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles snh2001, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  3. Stefano Maria Iacus & Giuseppe Porro, 2002. "Il lavoro interinale in Italia: uno sguardo all'offerta," Departmental Working Papers 2002-26, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  4. Bruce Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2004. "Employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market: the complete picture of gross worker flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-34, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Ron Boschma & Rikard Eriksson & Urban Lindgren, 2009. "How does labour mobility affect the performance of plants? The importance of relatedness and geographical proximity," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 169-190, March.
  6. David H. Autor, 2009. "Introduction to "Studies of Labor Market Intermediation"," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 1-23 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Fallick, Bruce & Fleischman, Charles A. & Rebitzer, James B., 2005. "Job-Hopping in Silicon Valley: Some Evidence Concerning the Micro-Foundations of a High Technology Cluster," IZA Discussion Papers 1799, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Giuseppe Porro & Andrea Vezzulli & Stefano Maria Iacus, 2004. "Temporary Agency Workers in Italy: Alternative Techniques of Classification," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(4), pages 699-725, December.
  9. Cooper, David P., 2001. "Innovation and reciprocal externalities: information transmission via job mobility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 403-425, August.
  10. Paul Almeida & Bruce Kogut, 1999. "Localization of Knowledge and the Mobility of Engineers in Regional Networks," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(7), pages 905-917, July.
  11. Nicola Brandt & Jean-Marc Burniaux & Romain Duval, 2005. "Assessing the OECD Jobs Strategy: Past Developments and Reforms," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 429, OECD Publishing.
  12. Giuseppe Tattara & Marco Valentini, 2010. "Turnover and Excess Worker Reallocation. The Veneto Labour Market between 1982 and 1996," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(4), pages 474-500, December.
  13. Andrea Ichino & Fabrizia Mealli & Tommaso Nannicini, 2005. "Temporary Work Agencies in Italy: A Springboard Toward Permanent Employment?," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 64(1), pages 1-27, September.
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