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Temporary Agency Workers in Italy: Alternative Techniques of Classification

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  • Giuseppe Porro
  • Andrea Vezzulli
  • Stefano Maria Iacus

Abstract

Cluster analysis and the classification tree technique are applied to investigate the relationship between the individual characteristics of Italian temporary help agency (THA) workers and their probability of achieving a temporary job. The application aims to show some advantages of these techniques with respect to traditional econometric tools. Sketches of the most common profiles among Italian THA workers are obtained as a result. Besides the typical THA worker pointed out by previous studies (young male workers, with a medium-high level of education, living in the Northern regions), two new profiles have been identified: the first comprising male manual workers with previous job experience, whose average age is over 30 and whose educational level is low; the second comprising young female workers with a medium-high level of education, working in the service sector or in the public sector. The results are compared with the more usual logit analysis and show their robustness. Copyright 2004 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Porro & Andrea Vezzulli & Stefano Maria Iacus, 2004. "Temporary Agency Workers in Italy: Alternative Techniques of Classification," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(4), pages 699-725, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:18:y:2004:i:4:p:699-725
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lazear, Edward P & Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "Rank-Order Tournaments as Optimum Labor Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 841-864, October.
    2. Margaret A. Meyer, 1992. "Biased Contests and Moral Hazard: Implications for Career Profiles," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 25-26, pages 165-187.
    3. Margaret A. Meyer, 1991. "Learning from Coarse Information: Biased Contests and Career Profiles," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 15-41.
    4. Canice Prendergast, 1999. "The Provision of Incentives in Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 7-63, March.
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    6. Gibbons, Robert & Waldman, Michael, 1999. "Careers in organizations: Theory and evidence," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 36, pages 2373-2437 Elsevier.
    7. Malcomson, James M, 1984. "Work Incentives, Hierarchy, and Internal Labor Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(3), pages 486-507, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlo Gianelle, 2014. "Labor market intermediaries make the world smaller," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(5), pages 951-981, November.
    2. Carlo Gianelle, 2011. "Temporary employment agencies make the world smaller:Evidence from labour mobility networks," Department of Economics University of Siena 618, Department of Economics, University of Siena.

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