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Exploring the complex structure of labour mobility networks. Evidence from Veneto microdata

  • Carlo Gianelle


    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari)

This essay investigates the network structure of inter-firm worker mobility in Veneto, an industrial region of Northern Italy, using comprehensive employer-employee matched data. The empirical network reveals a small world pattern that hinges critically upon a few hub firms. Main hubs are found to be: (1) long-established manufacturing companies; (2) wholesale companies; and (3) companies supplying workforce to third parties. The methodology of investigation provides a toolkit for monitoring labour market evolution, and should enable industry policies supporting labour reallocation mechanisms.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari" in its series Working Papers with number 2011_13.

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Length: 50
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2011_13
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  8. Ron Boschma & R. Eriksson & U. Lindgren, 2008. "How does Labour Mobility affect the Performance of Plants? The importance of relatedness and geographical proximity," DRUID Working Papers 08-14, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
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  15. Frenken, Koen, 2000. "A complexity approach to innovation networks. The case of the aircraft industry (1909-1997)," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 257-272, February.
  16. Sanjeev Goyal, 2007. "Introduction to Connections: An Introduction to the Economics of Networks
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  17. Anne Ter Wal & Ron Boschma, 2009. "Applying social network analysis in economic geography: framing some key analytic issues," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 739-756, September.
  18. Giuseppe Tattara & Marco Valentini, 2010. "Turnover and Excess Worker Reallocation. The Veneto Labour Market between 1982 and 1996," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(4), pages 474-500, December.
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