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Transferencias Monetarias y Crimen. Evidencia para la última década en Montevideo

Author

Listed:
  • Cecilia Alonso

    (Universidad de la República (Uruguay). Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y de Administración.)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effect of the Asignaciones Familiares del Plan de Equidad, a conditional cash transfer programme targeted to households with children under 18 years old and a vulnerable socio-economic situation, on property crimes in the city of Montevideo. The methodology used consists on the application of traditional models (Fixed effects and GMM Arellano-Bond) and spatial models (Durbin) on a data panel defined annually at the police jurisdiction level, built with administrative records of complaints and information gathered from the uruguayan Household Surveys for the period 2004 to 2016. The analysis reveals that the programme has no statistical significant effect on property crime.

Suggested Citation

  • Cecilia Alonso, 2018. "Transferencias Monetarias y Crimen. Evidencia para la última década en Montevideo," Documentos de Investigacion Estudiantil (students working papers) 18-02, Instituto de Economia - IECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulr:tpaper:die-02-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conditional cash transfers; crime; Spatial Econometrics; Uruguay;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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