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Determinants of violent and property crimes in England and Wales: a panel data analysis

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  • Lu Han
  • Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay
  • Samrat Bhattacharya

Abstract

We examine various determinants of property and violent crimes by using police force area level (PFA) data on England and Wales over the period of 1992--2008. Our list of potential determinants includes two law enforcement variables namely crime-specific detection rate and prison population, and various socio-economic variables such as unemployment rate, real earnings, proportion of young people and the Gini Coefficient. By adopting a fixed effect dynamic GMM estimation methodology we attempt to address the potential bias that arises from the presence of time-invariant unobserved characteristics of a PFA and the endogeneity of several regressors. There is a significant positive effect of own-lagged crime rate. The own-lagged effect is stronger for property crime, on an average, than violent crime. We find that, on an average, higher detection rate and prison population leads to lower property and violent crimes. This is robust to various specifications. However, socio-economic variables with the exception of real earnings play a limited role in explaining different crime types.

Suggested Citation

  • Lu Han & Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Samrat Bhattacharya, 2013. "Determinants of violent and property crimes in England and Wales: a panel data analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(34), pages 4820-4830, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:45:y:2013:i:34:p:4820-4830
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2013.806782
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Brosnan, Stephen, 2016. "The Socioeconomic Determinants of Crime in Ireland from 2003-2012," MPRA Paper 74118, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Caruso, Raul, 2014. "What is the relationship between unemployment and rape? Evidence from a panel of European regions," MPRA Paper 54725, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:eee:chieco:v:54:y:2019:i:c:p:51-72 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Samrat Bhattacharya & Rudra Sensarma, 2015. "An analysis of the factors determining crime in England and Wales: A quantile regression approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 665-679.
    5. Brosnan, Stephen, 2017. "The Impact of Sports Participation on Crime in England between 2012 and 2015," MPRA Paper 78596, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:eso:journl:v:49:y:2018:i:2:p:127-143 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:spr:soinre:v:140:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1774-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Bagchi Aniruddha & Bandyopadhyay Siddhartha, 2016. "Workplace Deviance and Recession," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 47-81, January.
    9. Ozkan, Turgut, 2016. "Reoffending among serious juvenile offenders: A developmental perspective," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 18-31.
    10. repec:eco:journ2:2019-01-11 is not listed on IDEAS

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