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Youth unemployment and crime in the English regions and Wales

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  • Fiona Carmichael
  • Robert Ward

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between unemployment and crime in England and Wales taking account of both age and gender in the unemployment measures. The study is for 1985-95 and is disaggregated to the regional level. We allow for different types of crime and the deterrence effects of detection and punishment. We also consider the relationship between ethnicity and crime in the light of the contentious public debate on this issue. Our results indicate that there is a systematic positive relationship between burglary rates and male unemployment regardless of age. However, we find that while youth unemployment is consistently and positively related to criminal damage and robbery rates there is no systematic evidence of a relationship between adult male unemployment and these specific crimes. Instead our evidence supports a positive link between adult unemployment and theft. We find no compelling evidence of a link between ethnicity and crime.

Suggested Citation

  • Fiona Carmichael & Robert Ward, 2000. "Youth unemployment and crime in the English regions and Wales," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 559-571.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:32:y:2000:i:5:p:559-571
    DOI: 10.1080/000368400322462
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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368400322462
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Brosnan, Stephen, 2016. "The Socioeconomic Determinants of Crime in Ireland from 2003-2012," MPRA Paper 74118, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Gail Pacheco, 2012. "The cost of poor transitions for youth," Working Papers 2012-09, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    3. Carmichael, Fiona & Ward, Robert, 2001. "Male unemployment and crime in England and Wales," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 111-115, October.
    4. Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay & Samrat Bhattacharya & Rudra Sensarma, 2015. "An analysis of the factors determining crime in England and Wales: A quantile regression approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 665-679.
    5. Gail Pacheco & Jessica Dye, 2013. "Estimating the Cost of Youth Disengagement in New Zealand," Working Papers 2013-04, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    6. Thomas A. Garrett & Lesli S. Ott, 2008. "City business cycles and crime," Working Papers 2008-026, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    7. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2004. "Crime rates, male youth unemployment and real income in Australia: evidence from Granger causality tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(18), pages 2079-2095.
    8. Dongxu Wu & Zhongmin Wu, 2012. "Crime, inequality and unemployment in England and Wales," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(29), pages 3765-3775, October.

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