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The cost of poor transitions for youth

  • Gail Pacheco


    (Department of Economics, Auckland University of Technology)

No abstract is available for this item.

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Paper provided by Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2012-09.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201209
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  1. Dongxu Wu & Zhongmin Wu, 2012. "Crime, inequality and unemployment in England and Wales," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(29), pages 3765-3775, October.
  2. Paul Gregg & Emma Tominey, 2004. "The Wage Scar from Youth Unemployment," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/097, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  3. Yann Algan & Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Alan Manning, 2009. "The economic situation of first- and second-generation immigrants in France, Germany and the United Kingdom," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28680, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Psacharopoulos, George & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2002. "Returns to investment in education : a further update," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2881, The World Bank.
  5. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Johannesson, Magnus, 2003. "A note on the effect of unemployment on mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 505-518, May.
  6. Fiona Carmichael & Robert Ward, 2000. "Youth unemployment and crime in the English regions and Wales," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 559-571.
  7. BĂ©land, Francois & Birch, Stephen & Stoddart, Greg, 2002. "Unemployment and health: contextual-level influences on the production of health in populations," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(11), pages 2033-2052, December.
  8. John Gibson, 2000. "Sheepskin effects and the returns to education in New Zealand: Do they differ by ethnic groups?," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 201-220.
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