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Do Migrants Really Save More? Understanding the Impact of Remittances on Savings in Rural China

Author

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  • Yu Zhu

    ()

  • Zhongmin Wu
  • Meiyan Wang
  • Yang Du
  • Fang Cai

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of remittances on the savings behaviour of rural households in China, using a cross-sectional survey. Allowing for endogeneity and left-censoring of remittances, we find that the marginal propensity to save out of remittances is well below half of that out of other sources of incomes. Moreover, we find no evidence of any direct effect of remittances on either capital input or gross output of farm production. These findings are in line with recent studies which conclude that remittances are largely used for consumption purposes by rural Chinese households and there is no link between migration and productive investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Yu Zhu & Zhongmin Wu & Meiyan Wang & Yang Du & Fang Cai, 2009. "Do Migrants Really Save More? Understanding the Impact of Remittances on Savings in Rural China," Studies in Economics 0923, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  • Handle: RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:0923
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dreger & Tongsan Wang & Yanqun Zhang, 2015. "Understanding Chinese Consumption: The Impact of Hukou," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 46(6), pages 1331-1344, November.
    2. Luc Christiaensen & Lei Pan, 2010. "Transfers and Development: Easy Come, Easy Go?," WIDER Working Paper Series 125, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Growth and cycles; recessions; technical efficiency; technical progress.;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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