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Expected Currency Excess Returns and International Business Cycles

  • Sanglim Lee

    (University of Connecticut)

It is well known that the uncovered interest parity condition does not hold empirically, implying that investments in high-interest rate currencies in foreign currency markets result in a positive expected excess return. Verdelhan (2010) successfully explains this phenomenon by referring to exogenous consumption processes and external habit formation. In this paper, I extend his model by using an international real business cycle model (Backus, Kehoe, and Kydland 1994) with internal habit formation. When the production-based stochastic discount factor is used, this benchmark model, driven by total factor productivity, accounts for this empirical evidence as well. JEL Classification: E32, E44, F31, F44 Key words: Currency Excess Return, Real Business Cycle, Forward Premium Puzzle

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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2012-16.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2012-16
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  1. Pau Rabanal & Juan Francisco Rubio-Ramirez & Vicente Tuesta Reátegui, 2010. "Cointegrated TFP Processes and International Business Cycles," Working Papers 10-11, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  2. David K. Backus & Patrick J. Kehoe & Finn E. Kydland, 1991. "International real business cycles," Staff Report 146, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  3. Fama, Eugene F., 1984. "Forward and spot exchange rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 319-338, November.
  4. Christian Zimmermann, 1996. "International Real Business Cycles among Heterogeneous Countries," Macroeconomics 9607002, EconWPA.
  5. Adrien Verdelhan, 2006. "A Habit-Based Explanation of the Exchange Rate Risk Premium," 2006 Meeting Papers 872, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Jeffrey Frankel & Jumana Poonawala, 2006. "The Forward Market in Emerging Currencies: Less Biased Than in Major Currencies," NBER Working Papers 12496, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Lustig, H. & Verdelhan, A., 2006. "The Cross-Section of Foreign Currency Risk Premia and Consumption Growth Risk," Working papers 155, Banque de France.
  8. Moore, Michael J. & Roche, Maurice J., 2002. "Less of a puzzle: a new look at the forward forex market," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 387-411, December.
  9. R. Mehra & E. Prescott, 2010. "The equity premium: a puzzle," Levine's Working Paper Archive 1401, David K. Levine.
  10. Heathcote, Jonathan & Perri, Fabrizio, 2002. "Financial autarky and international business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 601-627, April.
  11. Engel, Charles, 1996. "The forward discount anomaly and the risk premium: A survey of recent evidence," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 123-192, June.
  12. Bansal, Ravi & Dahlquist, Magnus, 2000. "The forward premium puzzle: different tales from developed and emerging economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 115-144, June.
  13. Bill Francis & Iftekhar Hasan & Delroy Hunter, 2002. "Emerging market liberalization and the impact on uncovered interest rate parity," Working Paper 2002-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  14. Hansen, Lars Peter & Hodrick, Robert J, 1980. "Forward Exchange Rates as Optimal Predictors of Future Spot Rates: An Econometric Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(5), pages 829-53, October.
  15. Ronald J. Balvers & Dayong Huang, 2005. "Productivity-Based Asset Pricing: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 05-05 Classification- JEL, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  16. Jermann, Urban J., 1998. "Asset pricing in production economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 257-275, April.
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