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The Strategic Display of Emotions

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Daniel
  • Hopfensitz, Astrid
  • van Leeuwen, Boris

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

  • van de Ven, Jeroen

Abstract

The emotion that someone expresses has consequences for how that person is treated. We study whether people display emotions strategically. In two laboratory experiments, participants play task delegation games in which managers assign a task to one of two workers. When assigning the task, managers see pictures of the workers and we vary whether getting the task is desirable or not. We find that workers strategically adapt their emotional expressions to the incentives they face, and that it indeed pays off to do so. Yet, workers do not exploit the full potential of the strategic display of emotions.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Daniel & Hopfensitz, Astrid & van Leeuwen, Boris & van de Ven, Jeroen, 2019. "The Strategic Display of Emotions," Discussion Paper 2019-014, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:ab45cbcc-1ea1-4762-b5c9-ecd16a6f33af
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    emotions; expressions; communication; experiment; incentives;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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