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Beliefs and truth-telling: A laboratory experiment

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  • Ronald Peeters

    ()

  • Marc Vorsatz

    ()

  • Markus Walzl

    ()

Abstract

We conduct a laboratory experiment with a constant-sum sender-receiver game to investigate the impact of individuals� first- and second-order beliefs on truth-telling. While senders are more likely to lie if they expect the receiver to trust their message (which is in line with expected payoff maximization), they are also more likely to tell the truth if they believe the receiver expects them to tell the truth. We observe no such dependence on second-order beliefs in a payoff equivalent game of matching pennies. Our results therefore indicate an impact of second-order beliefs as derived in models of guilt aversion in an antagonistic setting which is specific to strategic information transmission.

Suggested Citation

  • Ronald Peeters & Marc Vorsatz & Markus Walzl, 2012. "Beliefs and truth-telling: A laboratory experiment," Working Papers 2012-17, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, revised Nov 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:inn:wpaper:2012-17
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Weekly Roundup 185: A Curated Linkfest For The Smartest People On The Web!
      by Miguel in Simoleon Sense on 2012-09-09 22:13:42

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sascha Behnk & Iván Barreda-Tarrazona & Aurora García-Gallego, 2017. "An experimental test of reporting systems for deception," Working Papers 2017/11, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    2. Behnk, Sascha & Barreda-Tarrazona, Iván & García-Gallego, Aurora, 2014. "The role of ex post transparency in information transmission—An experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 45-64.
    3. Karl H. Schlag & Joël J. van der Weele, 2015. "A method to elicit beliefs as most likely intervals," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(5), pages 456-468, September.
    4. Ronald Peeters & Marc Vorsatz, 2018. "Simple guilt and cooperation," Working Papers 1801, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Experiment; Sender-receiver games; Strategic information transmission; Guilt-from-blame; let-down aversion;

    JEL classification:

    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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