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Education and Labor Market Activity of Women: An Age-Group Specific Empirical Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Claudia Münch

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Sweder van Wijnbergen

    (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

We analyze the determinants of female labor market participation for different age-groups in the European Union. We show that female participation is positively affected by tertiary education at any age. But upper secondary education increases participation only up to an age of 40 while after that it has no effect or even a negative impact The results are tested for robustness and controlled for endogeneity. The results show that increasing educational attainment levels in the female population will contribute significantly to higher aggregate participation rates. However,in simulations up to 2050 such benefits are partially offset by a negative aging effect. This paper is based on the first author's Master thesis presented for the Master of Science in Economics, University of Amsterdam.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Münch & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2009. "Education and Labor Market Activity of Women: An Age-Group Specific Empirical Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-099/2, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20090099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    female labour market participation; fertility; educational achievements; aging;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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