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Is part-time employment here to stay? Evidence from the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992-2005

Author

Listed:
  • Nicole Bosch

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Anja Deelen

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Rob Euwals

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

Abstract

In this study, we investigate the development of working hours over successive generations of women using the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992-2005. To balance work and family responsibilities, the Netherlands have chosen a rather unique model that combines a high female employment rate with a high part-time employment rate. The model is likely to be the result of (societal) preferences as the removal of institutional barriers, like lower marginal tax rates for partners and better childcare facilities, has not led to more working hours. It is, however, an open question whether the model is here to stay or whether younger generations of women will choose full-time jobs in the near future. We find evidence of an increasing propensity to work part-time over the successive generations, and a decreasing propensity to work full-time for the generations born after the early 1950s. Our results are in line with results of studies on social norms and attitudes as they find a similar pattern over the successive generations. It therefore seems likely that without changes in (societal) preferences the part-time employment model is indeed here to stay for some more time.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicole Bosch & Anja Deelen & Rob Euwals, 2008. "Is part-time employment here to stay? Evidence from the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992-2005," CPB Discussion Paper 100, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:100
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    Cited by:

    1. Claudia M√ľnch & Sweder van Wijnbergen, 2009. "Education and Labor Market Activity of Women: An Age-Group Specific Empirical Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-099/2, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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