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Emerging Market Economies and Turkey in the Globalization Age

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  • Orhun Sevinc

Abstract

[EN] Globalization, which continued uninterruptedly from the 1980s to the recent period, was accompanied by rapid transformations in trade, finance and technology. In addition to its common impacts such as economic integration and increased mobility of labor, capital and information, the opportunities and risks caused by globalization significantly differ across countries. This study reviews the changes in growth, unemployment, inflation, trade and industry dynamics in emerging markets and Turkey vis-à-vis globalization and discusses aggregate and country-specific conditions to benefit more from globalization. [TR] 1980’lerden gunumuze kadar araliksiz devam eden kuresellesme sureci ticaret, finans ve teknoloji alanindaki hizli donusumleri beraberinde getirmistir. Ulkelerin ekonomik butunlesmesine ek olarak isgucu hareketliligi ile sermaye ve bilginin dolasimini hizlandirmasi gibi genel sonuclar iceren kuresellesme, sagladigi gelisim imkanlari ve yol actigi riskler acisindan ise ulkeden ulkeye belirgin farkliliklar gostermektedir. Bu calismada, gelismekte olan ulkeler ve Turkiye’de kuresellesme sureciyle birlikte buyume, issizlik, enflasyon, ticaret ve sanayi dinamiklerinin ne yonde degistigi incelenmekte ve kuresellesmeden daha cok yararlanabilmeye iliskin olarak genel ve ulkeye ozgu kosullar tartisilmaktadir.

Suggested Citation

  • Orhun Sevinc, 2018. "Emerging Market Economies and Turkey in the Globalization Age," CBT Research Notes in Economics 1814, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcb:econot:1814
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    References listed on IDEAS

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