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Phasing out: Routine tasks and retirement

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  • van der Velde, Lucas

Abstract

This paper studies the link between task content of jobs and exits to retirement by older workers. This research provides a comparative analysis of retirement timing in Germany and Great Britain. In Germany, workers in more routine jobs had between one and two percentage points higher probability leaving the labor market faster when compared to workers in less routine occupations. The relationship is robust and relatively constant over time. In Great Britain, by contrast, workers from routine and non-routine jobs appear to leave the labor market with a similar timing. I contend that institutional characteristics can explain the differences across countries.

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  • van der Velde, Lucas, 2022. "Phasing out: Routine tasks and retirement," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 784-803.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:50:y:2022:i:3:p:784-803
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jce.2022.01.004
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Task content of jobs; Retirement; Comparative analysis; Institutions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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