IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eko/ekoeko/47_23.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do entrants take it all? The evolution of task content of jobs in Poland

Author

Listed:
  • Wojciech Hardy
  • Roma Keister
  • Piotr Lewandowski

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the changes in task content of jobs in Poland between 1996 and 2014. We follow the approach of Autor, Levy and Murnane (2003) and Acemoglu and Autor (2011) and use the O*NET 2003 and 2014 data combined with the Polish LFS data at a 4-digit occupation classification. We find an increasing intensity of both non-routine and routine cognitive tasks, and a decreasing intensity of both routine and non-routine manual tasks, mainly due to shifts in the employment structure between occupations. Cohorts born after 1970 underwent large shifts in the task intensity structure and contributed most to the overall changes in task contents, while almost no adjustments occurred in cohorts born before 1970. The growth of non-routine cognitive tasks among workers born after the 1970 was largely driven by the tertiary education boom in Poland, although in some cohorts the rising supply of tertiary graduates was accompanied by a relative reduction of the non-routine content of jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Wojciech Hardy & Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2016. "Do entrants take it all? The evolution of task content of jobs in Poland," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 47.
  • Handle: RePEc:eko:ekoeko:47_23
    DOI: 10.17451/eko/47/2016/229
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ekonomia.wne.uw.edu.pl/ekonomia/getFile/799
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Omar S. Arias & Carolina Sánchez-Páramo & María E. Dávalos & Indhira Santos & Erwin R. Tiongson & Carola Gruen & Natasha de Andrade Falcão & Gady Saiovici & Cesar A. Cancho, 2014. "Back to Work : Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16570.
    2. Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu, 2012. "The Trend is the Cycle: Job Polarization and Jobless Recoveries," NBER Working Papers 18334, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    4. Piotr Lewandowski & Pawel Chrostek & Jan Baran & Iga Magda & Maciej Lis & Anna Pankowiec & Piotr Szczerba & Maciej Bitner & Magdalena Kaminska, 2014. "Employment in Poland 2013. Labour in the Age of Structural Change," Books and Reports published by IBS, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych, number zwp2013 edited by Piotr Lewandowski & Iga Magda.
    5. Lars Sondergaard & Mamta Murthi & Dina Abu-Ghaida & Christian Bodewig & Jan Rutkowski, 2012. "Skills, Not Just Diplomas : Managing Education for Results in Eastern Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2368.
    6. David H. Autor, 2015. "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
    7. Karol Pogorzelski, 2014. "Agricultural Development and Structural Change," IBS Policy Papers 5/2014, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    8. Maciej Bukowski & Piotr Lewandowski & Irena Kotowska & Anna Baranowska & Izabela Grabowska & Karol Pogorzelski & Tymon Sloczynski & Pawel Strzelecki & Anna Matysiak & Horacy Debowski & Maciej Lis, 2010. "Employment in Poland 2008. Work over the life course," Books and Reports published by IBS, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych, number zwp2008 edited by Maciej Bukowski.
    9. Leszek Wincenciak, 2015. "Was It All Worth It? On the Value of Tertiary Education for Generation ’77 in Poland," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 42.
    10. Zbigniew Matkowski & Mariusz Próchniak, 2007. "Economic Convergence Between the CEE-8 and the European Union," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(1), pages 59-76, February.
    11. Salvatori, Andrea, 2015. "The Anatomy of Job Polarisation in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 9193, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wojciech Hardy & Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2016. "Technology or Upskilling? Trends in the Task Composition of Jobs in Central and Eastern Europe," HKUST IEMS Working Paper Series 2016-40, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Dec 2016.
    2. Szymon Gorka & Wojciech Hardy & Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2017. "Tasks and skills in European labour markets. Background paper for the World Bank report “Growing United: Upgrading Europe’s Convergence Machine”," IBS Research Reports 03/2017, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    3. Lucas van der Velde, 2017. "Phasing out: routine tasks and retirement," GRAPE Working Papers 23, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    4. Szymon Gorka & Wojciech Hardy & Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2017. "Age, tasks and skills in European labour markets. Background paper for the world bank report “Growing United: Upgrading Europe’s Convergence Machine”," IBS Research Reports 04/2017, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    5. Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2016. "A routine transition? Causes and consequences of the changing content of jobs in Central and Eastern Europe," IBS Policy Papers 05/2016, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    task content of jobs; routinisation; intergenerational divide;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eko:ekoeko:47_23. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.sciendo.com/services/journals .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.