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Does Protecting Older Workers from Discrimination Make It Harder to Get Hired? Evidence from Disability Discrimination Laws

Author

Listed:
  • David Neumark
  • Joanne Song
  • Patrick Button

Abstract

We explore the effects of disability discrimination laws on hiring of older workers. A concern with anti-discrimination laws is that they may reduce hiring by raising the cost of terminations and – in the specific case of disability discrimination laws – raising the cost of employment because of the need to accommodate disabled workers. Moreover, disability discrimination laws can affect non-disabled older workers because they are fairly likely to develop work-related disabilities, yet are not protected by these laws. Using state variation in disability discrimination protections, we find little or no evidence that stronger disability discrimination laws lower the hiring of non-disabled older workers. We similarly find no evidence of adverse effects of disability discrimination laws on hiring of disabled older workers.

Suggested Citation

  • David Neumark & Joanne Song & Patrick Button, 2015. "Does Protecting Older Workers from Discrimination Make It Harder to Get Hired? Evidence from Disability Discrimination Laws," NBER Working Papers 21379, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21379
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w21379.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blau, David M, 1994. "Labor Force Dynamics of Older Men," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(1), pages 117-156, January.
    2. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1990. "Bridge Jobs and Partial Retirement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 482-501, October.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Does Protecting Older Workers from Discrimination Make It Harder to Get Hired? Evidence from Disability Discrimination Laws By: David Neumark ; Joanne Song ; Patrick Button
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2015-07-29 23:02:29

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Neumark, 2016. "Experimental Research on Labor Market Discrimination," NBER Working Papers 22022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. repec:sae:ilrrev:v:71:y:2018:i:2:p:365-393 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Fleck, Robert K. & Hanssen, F. Andrew, 2016. "Persistence and change in age-specific gender gaps: Hollywood actors from the silent era onward," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 36-49.
    4. David Neumark & Ian Burn & Patrick Button & Nanneh Chehras, 2016. "Do State Laws Protecting Older Workers from Discrimination Reduce Age Discrimination in Hiring? Experimental (and Nonexperimental) Evidence," Working Papers wp349, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    5. Mason Ameri & Lisa Schur & Meera Adya & Scott Bentley & Patrick McKay & Douglas Kruse, 2015. "The Disability Employment Puzzle: A Field Experiment on Employer Hiring Behavior," NBER Working Papers 21560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Lucas van der Velde, 2017. "Phasing out: routine tasks and retirement," GRAPE Working Papers 23, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    7. Patrick Button, 2018. "Expanding Employment Discrimination Protections for Individuals with Disabilities: Evidence from California," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 71(2), pages 365-393, March.
    8. Serena Rhee & Soojin Kim, 2016. "Measuring the Effects of Employment Protection Policies for the Disabled: Theory and Evidence from the Americans with Disabilities Act," Working Papers 201621, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J78 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Public Policy (including comparable worth)

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