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Access to treatment and educational inequalities in cancer survival

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Abstract

The public health care systems in the Nordic countries provide high quality care almost free of charge to all citizens. However, social inequalities in health persist. Previous research has, for example, documented substantial educational inequalities in cancer survival. We investigate to what extent this may be driven by differential access to and utilization of high quality treatment options. Quasi-experimental evidence based on the establishment of regional cancer wards indicates that i) highly educated individuals utilized centralized specialized treatment to a greater extent than less educated patients and ii) the use of such treatment improved these patients' survival.

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  • Jon H. Fiva & Torbjørn Hægeland & Marte Rønning & Astri Syse, 2013. "Access to treatment and educational inequalities in cancer survival," Discussion Papers 735, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:735
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    Cited by:

    1. Kinge, Jonas Minet & Vallejo-Torres, Laura & Morris, Stephen, 2015. "Income related inequalities in avoidable mortality in Norway: A population-based study using data from 1994–2011," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(7), pages 889-898.
    2. Jens Kvaerner, 2016. "What Can Shocks to Life Expectancy Reveal About Bequest Motives?," 2016 Meeting Papers 1381, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Health; Inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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