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Inequality, Redistributive Policies and Multiplier Dynamics in an Agent-Based Model with Credit Rationing

Author

Listed:
  • Elisa Palagi
  • Mauro Napoletano
  • Andrea Roventini
  • Jean-Luc Gaffard

Abstract

We build an agent-based model populated by households with heterogenous and time-varying financial conditions in order to study how different inequality shocks affect income dynamics and the effects of different types of fiscal policy responses. We show that inequality shocks generate persistent falls in aggregate income by increasing the fraction of credit-constrained households and by lowering aggregate consumption. Furthermore, we experiment with different types of fiscal policies to counter the effects of inequality-generated recessions, namely deficit-spending direct government consumption and redistributive subsidies financed by different types of taxes. We find that subsidies are in general associated with higher fiscal multipliers than direct government expenditure, as they appear to be better suited to sustain consumption of lower income households after the shock. In addition, we show that the effectiveness of redistributive subsidies increases if they are financed by taxing financial incomes or savings.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisa Palagi & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini & Jean-Luc Gaffard, 2017. "Inequality, Redistributive Policies and Multiplier Dynamics in an Agent-Based Model with Credit Rationing," LEM Papers Series 2017/05, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2017/05
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ijm:journl:v10:y:2018:i:1:p:61-96 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Papadopoulos, Georgios, 2018. "Income inequality, consumption, credit and credit risk in a data-driven agent-based model," MPRA Paper 89764, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    income inequality; scal multipliers; redistributive policies; credit-rationing; agent-based models;

    JEL classification:

    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques

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