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Bargaining Frictions, Labor Income Taxation, and Economic Performance

Author

Listed:
  • Stéphane Auray

    () (Université Lille 3 (GREMARS), Université de Sherbrooke (GREDI) and CIRPÉE)

  • Samuel Danthine

    () (Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Universidad de Malaga and CIRPEE)

Abstract

This paper is an attempt to explain differences in economic performance between a subset of OECD countries. We classify countries in terms of their degree of rigidity in the labor market, and use a matching model with labor/leisure choice, bargaining frictions, and labor income taxation to capture these rigidity differences. Added flexibility improves economic performance in different ways depending on whether income taxation is high or low. Feeding income taxation rates estimated from the countries at hand, we find that the model is able to replicate the observed rigidity levels. The model is also shown to reproduce well cross-country differences in non-employment population ratios and the share of part-time jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Stéphane Auray & Samuel Danthine, 2009. "Bargaining Frictions, Labor Income Taxation, and Economic Performance," Cahiers de recherche 09-20, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
  • Handle: RePEc:shr:wpaper:09-20
    as

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    File URL: http://gredi.recherche.usherbrooke.ca/wpapers/GREDI-0920.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    models of search and matching; bargaining frictions; economic performance; labor market institutions; part-time jobs; labor market rigidities;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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