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Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation and Emission Intensities in Agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • Uwe A. Schneider
  • Pete Smith

    () (Research unit Sustainability and Global Change)

Abstract

Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions are closely linked. This paper reviews agricultural options to reduce energy intensities and their impacts, discusses important accounting issues related to system boundaries, land scarcity, and measurement units, and compares agricultural energy intensities and improvement potentials on an international level. Agricultural development in the past decades, while increasing yields, led to lower average energy efficiencies between the sixties and mid eighties. In the last two decades, energy intensities in developed countries increased, however, with little impact on greenhouse gas emissions. Efficiency differences across countries suggest a maximum improvement potential of 500 million tons of CO2 annually.

Suggested Citation

  • Uwe A. Schneider & Pete Smith, 2008. "Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation and Emission Intensities in Agriculture," Working Papers FNU-164, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jul 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:164
    as

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    File URL: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/fileadmin/fnu-files/publication/working-papers/fnu164_schneider_smith_ee.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alcantara, Vicent & Roca, Jordi, 1995. "Energy and CO2 emissions in Spain : Methodology of analysis and some results for 1980-1990," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 221-230, July.
    2. Uwe Schneider & Bruce McCarl, 2003. "Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 291-312.
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    5. Searchinger, Timothy & Heimlich, Ralph & Houghton, R. A. & Dong, Fengxia & Elobeid, Amani & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Tokgoz, Simla & Hayes, Dermot J. & Yu, Hun-Hsiang, 2008. "Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12881, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Edwards, Brian K. & Howitt, Richard E. & Flaim, Silvio J., 1996. "Fuel, crop, and water substitution in irrigated agriculture," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 311-331, October.
    7. Tzilivakis, J. & Warner, D.J. & May, M. & Lewis, K.A. & Jaggard, K., 2005. "An assessment of the energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) production in the UK," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 101-119, August.
    8. Traxler, Greg & Byerlee, Derek R., 2001. "Linking technical change to research effort: an examination of aggregation and spillovers effects," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 24(3), March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy intensity; Agriculture; Greenhouse gas emissions; Mitigation potential; Fertilizer efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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