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Do SVARs with Sign Restrictions Not Identify Unconventional Monetary Policy Shocks?

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Listed:
  • Jef Boeckx
  • Maarten Dossche
  • Alessandro Galesi
  • Boris Hofmann
  • Gert Peersman

    ()

Abstract

A growing empirical literature has shown, based on structural vector autoregressions (SVARs) identified through sign restrictions, that unconventional monetary policies implemented after the outbreak of the Great Financial Crisis (GFC) had expansionary macroeconomic effects. In a recent paper, Elbourne and Ji (2019) conclude that these studies fail to identify true unconventional monetary policy shocks in the euro area. In this note, we show that their findings are actually fully consistent with a successful identification of unconventional monetary policy shocks by the earlier studies and that their approach does not serve the purpose of evaluating identification strategies of SVARs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jef Boeckx & Maarten Dossche & Alessandro Galesi & Boris Hofmann & Gert Peersman, 2019. "Do SVARs with Sign Restrictions Not Identify Unconventional Monetary Policy Shocks?," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 19/973, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:19/973
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Duarte, Joao B. & Mann, Samuel, 2018. "One money, many markets: a factor model approach to monetary policy in the Euro Area with high-frequency identification," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 87182, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Martin Feldkircher & Thomas Gruber & Florian Huber, 2017. "Spreading the word or reducing the term spread? Assessing spillovers from euro area monetary policy," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp248, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    3. Uhlig, Harald, 2005. "What are the effects of monetary policy on output? Results from an agnostic identification procedure," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 381-419, March.
    4. repec:eee:jmacro:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:115-138 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sims, Christopher A, 1998. "Comment on Glenn Rudebusch's "Do Measures of Monetary Policy in a VAR Make Sense?"," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 933-941, November.
    6. Gert Peersman, 2005. "What caused the early millennium slowdown? Evidence based on vector autoregressions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 185-207.
    7. Jef Boeckx & Maarten Dossche & Gert Peersman, 2017. "Effectiveness and Transmission of the ECB's Balance Sheet Policies," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(1), pages 297-333, February.
    8. Lewis, Vivien & Roth, Markus, 2017. "The financial market effects of the ECB's asset purchase programs," Discussion Papers 23/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    9. Leonardo Gambacorta & Boris Hofmann & Gert Peersman, 2014. "The Effectiveness of Unconventional Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound: A Cross‐Country Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(4), pages 615-642, June.
    10. Adam Elbourne & Kan Ji, 2019. "Do zero and sign restricted SVARs identify unconventional monetary policy shocks in the euro area?," CPB Discussion Paper 391, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
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    15. Boris Hofmann & Gert Peersman, 2017. "Monetary policy transmission and trade-offs in the United States: Old and new," BIS Working Papers 649, Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Gert Peersman, 2018. "International Food Commodity Prices and Missing (Dis)Inflation in the Euro Area," Working Paper Research 350, National Bank of Belgium.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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