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An Empirical Analysis of the Effects of Syrian Refugees on the Turkish Labor Market

Author

Listed:
  • Suzuki, Ken

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Paul, Saumik

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Maru, Takeshi

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Kusadokoro, Motoi

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

We examine the effects of the recent influx of Syrian refugees on the Turkish labor market. Exploiting this natural experiment, we estimated the causal impacts of involuntary migration on labor market outcomes. We selected the five refugee-hosting regions with the highest number of refugees as treatment regions and four comparable regions with a low refugee-to-population ratio as control regions. Using a difference-in-differences estimation, we found that informal Turkish workers in the refugee-hosting regions were about 4% more likely to leave their job than workers in regions that did not widely host refugees. Such negative impacts on labor market outcomes became larger in 2014–2015 compared with 2012–2013. Furthermore, while females and older workers withdrew themselves from the labor market, males and younger workers become unemployed after the refugee influx.

Suggested Citation

  • Suzuki, Ken & Paul, Saumik & Maru, Takeshi & Kusadokoro, Motoi, 2019. "An Empirical Analysis of the Effects of Syrian Refugees on the Turkish Labor Market," ADBI Working Papers 935, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0935
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Binnur Balkan & Semih Tumen, 2016. "Immigration and prices: quasi-experimental evidence from Syrian refugees in Turkey," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 657-686, July.
    2. Jennifer Hunt, 1992. "The Impact of the 1962 Repatriates from Algeria on the French Labor Market," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(3), pages 556-572, April.
    3. Aysit Tansel & Elif Öznur Acar, 2017. "Labor mobility across the formal/informal divide in Turkey: Evidence from individual-level data," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 44(4), pages 617-635, September.
    4. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769, September.
    5. Evren Ceritoglu & H. Burcu Gurcihan Yunculer & Huzeyfe Torun & Semih Tumen, 2017. "The impact of Syrian refugees on natives’ labor market outcomes in Turkey: evidence from a quasi-experimental design," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-28, December.
    6. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 9755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:29:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1057_s41287-016-0013-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    refugee; migration; Syria; Turkey; difference-in-differences estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General

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