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The Brazilian Payroll Lending Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Christiano Arrigoni Coelho

    () (Banco Central do Brasil e Department of Economics PUC-Rio)

  • Bruno Funchal

    () (FUCAPE Business School)

  • João Manoel Pinho de Mello

    () (Department of Economics PUC-Rio)

Abstract

In 2004, Brazil provided an interesting natural experiment concerning personal credit. A new law was enacted allowing banks to offer loans with repayment through automatic payroll or social security benefit deduction, thus removing a significant part of the moral hazard problem by eliminating the choice of default when debtors are able to pay their loans out of their wages. We estimate the impact of the new law using car loans as a control group. We find that, at the industry level, the new law has caused a reduction in interest rates and an increase in the volume of personal credit.

Suggested Citation

  • Christiano Arrigoni Coelho & Bruno Funchal & João Manoel Pinho de Mello, 2010. "The Brazilian Payroll Lending Experiment," Textos para discussão 573, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
  • Handle: RePEc:rio:texdis:573
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Djankov, Simeon & McLiesh, Caralee & Shleifer, Andrei, 2007. "Private credit in 129 countries," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 299-329, May.
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    4. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Paul J. Gertler & Maitreesh Ghatak, 2002. "Empowerment and Efficiency: Tenancy Reform in West Bengal," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 239-280, April.
    5. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    6. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    7. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-679, June.
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    9. Ana Carla A. Costa & João M. P. De Mello, 2008. "Judicial Risk and Credit Market Performance: Micro Evidence from Brazilian Payroll Loans," NBER Chapters,in: Financial Markets Volatility and Performance in Emerging Markets, pages 155-184 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. repec:hrv:faseco:30728041 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aloisio Araujo & Bruno Funchal, 2015. "How Much Should Debtors be Punished in Case of Default?," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 229-245, April.
    2. Patrice Robitaille, 2011. "Liquidity and reserve requirements in Brazil," International Finance Discussion Papers 1021, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Marco Bonomo & Ricardo Brito & Bruno Martins, 2014. "Macroeconomic and Financial Consequences of the After Crisis Government-Driven Credit Expansion in Brazil," Working Papers Series 378, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    4. Guilherme Lichand & Rodrigo R. Soares, 2014. "Access to Justice and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Brazil's Special Civil Tribunals," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(2), pages 459-499.
    5. Juliano J. Assunção & Efraim Benmelech & Fernando S. S. Silva, 2014. "Repossession and the Democratization of Credit," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(9), pages 2661-2689.
    6. International Monetary Fund & World Bank, 2013. "Financial Inclusion in Brazil : Building on Success," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16739, The World Bank.
    7. Marco Bonomo & Ricardo Brito & Bruno Martins, 2015. "Macroeconomic and Financial Consequences of the Post-Crisis Government-Driven Credit Expansion in Brazil," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 88337, Inter-American Development Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Credit markets; collateral; difference-in-differences. JEL Code: G21; D01; C33; K00; E44.;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • K00 - Law and Economics - - General - - - General (including Data Sources and Description)
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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