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Multilevel Transmission of Cultural Attitudes and Entrepreneurial Intention: Evidence from High-School Students

Author

Listed:
  • Annie Tubadji

    () (Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Italy)

  • Enrico Santarelli

    () (Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Italy)

  • Roberto Patuelli

    () (Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Italy; The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, Italy)

Abstract

Intention toward any occupational choice can be widely categorized as a rational choice process combined with a subjective attitude function. There is extensive literature dealing with the formation of intention toward entrepreneurship in adolescents, in particular as a result of either parental (vertical) transmission of social capital or network effects from peers or neighbours (the latter two being two different levels of horizontal transmission varying in proximity in terms of bonding and bridging). We contribute to this literature by considering the joint effect of all these three levels simultaneously, in order to avoid an underspecification of the model due to omission of important cultural factors. We hypothesize that such three levels identify a mechanism where the individual perception of their importance interacts with their objective characteristics. With data for second-year high-school students, and employing empirical triangulation through Logit and 3SLS methods, we find evidence for a strong parental effect and of secondary peer effects on student intention. We also detect clear endogenous effects from the neighbourhood and the overall cultural context. Moreover, entrepreneurship is confirmed to be perceived, even by students, as a buffer for unemployment and social mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Annie Tubadji & Enrico Santarelli & Roberto Patuelli, 2016. "Multilevel Transmission of Cultural Attitudes and Entrepreneurial Intention: Evidence from High-School Students," Working Paper series 16-23, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:16-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tüzin Baycan & Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "A socio-economic impact analysis of urban cultural diversity: pathways and horizons," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 5, pages 175-202 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Huyghe, Annelore & Knockaert, Mirjam & Obschonka, Martin, 2016. "Unraveling the “passion orchestra” in academia," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 344-364.
    3. Dejan Jelovac & Zeger Wal & Ana Jelovac, 2011. "Business and Government Ethics in the “New” and “Old” EU: An Empirical Account of Public–Private Value Congruence in Slovenia and the Netherlands," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 103(1), pages 127-141, September.
    4. Daron Acemoglu & James Robinson, 2010. "The Role of Institutions in Growth and Development," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 1(2).
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R32 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Other Spatial Production and Pricing Analysis
    • R38 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Government Policy
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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