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The Aggregate Implications of Gender and Marriage

Author

Listed:
  • Mariacristina De Nardi

    (UCL, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, CE)

  • Fang Yang

    (Louisiana State University)

  • Margherita Borella

    (Unversity of Torino)

Abstract

Wages, labor market participation, hours worked, and savings differ by gender and marital status. In addition, women and married people make up for a large fraction of the population and of labor market participants, total hours worked, and total earnings. For the most part, macroeconomists have been ignoring women and marriage in setting up structural models and by calibrating them using data on males only. In this paper we ask whether ignoring gender and marriage in both models and data implies that the resulting calibration matches well the key economic aggregates. We find that it does not and we ask whether there are other calibration strategies or relatively simple models of marriage that can improve the fit of the model to aggregate data.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariacristina De Nardi & Fang Yang & Margherita Borella, 2017. "The Aggregate Implications of Gender and Marriage," 2017 Meeting Papers 46, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed017:46
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bairoliya, Neha, 2019. "Pension plan heterogeneity and retirement behavior," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 28-59.
    2. Kathrin Ellieroth, 2019. "Spousal Insurance, Precautionary Labor Supply, and the Business Cycle - A Quantitative Analysis," 2019 Meeting Papers 1134, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Espinoza, Raphael & Ostry, Jonathan D. & Papageorgiou, Chris, 2019. "The Armistice of the Sexes: Gender Complementarities in the Production Function," CEPR Discussion Papers 13792, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Margherita Borella & Mariacristina De Nardi & Fang Yang, 2019. "Are Marriage-Related Taxes and Social Security Benefits Holding Back Female Labor Supply?," NBER Working Papers 26097, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Juan Carlos Conesa & Daniela Costa & Parisa Kamali & Timothy J. Kehoe & Vegard Nygard & Gajen Raveendranathan & Akshar Saxena, . "Macroeconomic Effects of Medicare," Staff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    6. Conesa, Juan Carlos & Costa, Daniela & Kamali, Parisa & Kehoe, Timothy J. & Nygard, Vegard M. & Raveendranathan, Gajendran & Saxena, Akshar, 2018. "Macroeconomic effects of Medicare," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 11(C), pages 27-40.
    7. Margherita Borella & Mariacristina De Nardi & Fang Yang, 2017. "Marriage-related Policies in an Estimated Life-cycle Model of Households’ Labor Supply and Savings for Two Cohorts," Working Papers wp371, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    8. Margherita Borella & Mariacristina De Nardi & Fang Yang, 2017. "The Effects of Marriage-Related Taxes and Social Security Benefits," NBER Working Papers 23972, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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