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Foreign Investment and Domestic Productivity: Identifying Knowledge Spillovers and Competition Effects

Author

Listed:
  • Vadym Volosovych

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Carolina Villegas Sanchez

    (ESADE Business School)

  • Bent Sorensen

    (University of Houston)

  • Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan

    (University of Maryland)

Abstract

We identify knowledge spillovers from foreign investment to domestic firms using novel measures of ``closeness'' of foreign-owned and domestic and domestic firms in product space and in technology space. We rely on a new data set that spans six advanced countries connecting firms internationally in order to, a) separate competition effects on domestic firms from knowledge spillovers when domestic and foreign-owned firms are close in product space, and b) identify spillovers from foreign-owned firms that are close to domestic firms in technology space. We find strong negative competition effects on domestic firms that produce in the same {four-digit} sector as the foreign firms and positive knowledge spillovers to domestic firms operating in the same {two-digit} sector (but in different four-digit sectors). Using a measure of ``technological closeness,'' building on the work of Bloom, Schankerman, and van Reenen (2013), we find significant knowledge spillovers to firms which are close in technology space. On average, knowledge spillovers explain 60 percent of the total factor productivity improvement for domestic firms that are technologically close to foreign firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Vadym Volosovych & Carolina Villegas Sanchez & Bent Sorensen & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 2017. "Foreign Investment and Domestic Productivity: Identifying Knowledge Spillovers and Competition Effects," 2017 Meeting Papers 1194, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed017:1194
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nicholas Bloom & Mirko Draca & John Van Reenen, 2016. "Trade Induced Technical Change? The Impact of Chinese Imports on Innovation, IT and Productivity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(1), pages 87-117.
    2. Jonathan E. Haskel & Sonia C. Pereira & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2007. "Does Inward Foreign Direct Investment Boost the Productivity of Domestic Firms?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 482-496, August.
    3. Philippe Aghion & Nick Bloom & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt, 2005. "Competition and Innovation: an Inverted-U Relationship," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(2), pages 701-728.
    4. Gita Gopinath & Şebnem Kalemli-Özcan & Loukas Karabarbounis & Carolina Villegas-Sanchez, 2017. "Capital Allocation and Productivity in South Europe," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 1915-1967.
    5. Nicholas Bloom & Mark Schankerman & John Van Reenen, 2013. "Identifying Technology Spillovers and Product Market Rivalry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(4), pages 1347-1393, July.
    6. Ann E. Harrison & Leslie A. Martin & Shanthi Nataraj, 2013. "Learning versus Stealing: How Important Are Market-Share Reallocations to India's Productivity Growth?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 27(2), pages 202-228.
    7. Amil Petrin & Jerome Reiter & Kirk White, 2011. "The Impact of Plant-level Resource Reallocations and Technical Progress on U.S. Macroeconomic Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 14(1), pages 3-26, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Escobar, Octavio & Mühlen, Henning, 2018. "The role of FDI in structural change: Evidence from Mexico," KCG Working Papers 13, Kiel Centre for Globalization (KCG).
    2. Girum Abebe & Margaret S. McMillan & Michel Serafinelli, 2018. "Foreign Direct Investment and Knowledge Diffusion in Poor Locations: Evidence from Ethiopia," NBER Working Papers 24461, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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