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Large Firms and Internal Labor Markets

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  • Theodore Papageorgiou

    (Penn State University)

Abstract

This paper introduces a model of internal labor markets that is consistent with the observed differences between workers in large and small firms with respect to wages and separation rates. In particular, firms constitute labor markets with no search frictions. Workers are free to move within a firm at no cost, whereas switching across firms is costly. If the quality of a match between a worker and a occupation/department/team within a firm is uncertain, then larger firms offer more opportunities for workers to find the right match. As a result, workers abandon unpromising matches more easily and are more likely to be employed in better matches. In equilibrium, workers in larger firms are more productive, earn higher wages and are less likely to quit, even conditional on their wage. Using data from the 1996 SIPP we find support for the predictions of our framework: internal mobility is higher in larger firms and depends negatively on wages and tenure; workers in larger firms switch occupations at higher wage levels and receive higher wages in their new occupation; the size-wage premium is higher for workers with longer tenure, while workers who leave large firms continue to enjoy high wages, but only if they remain in the same occupation; and finally the wage and size effects on the separation probability are significantly larger for workers who switch occupations.

Suggested Citation

  • Theodore Papageorgiou, 2010. "Large Firms and Internal Labor Markets," 2010 Meeting Papers 1216, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:1216
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2010/paper_1216.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maury Gittleman & Michael Horrigan & Mary Joyce, 1998. "“Flexible†Workplace Practices: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Survey," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(1), pages 99-115, October.
    2. Theodore Papageorgiou, 2009. "Learning Your Comparative Advantages," 2009 Meeting Papers 1150, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    4. Moore, Henry Ludwell, 1911. "Laws of Wages: An essay in statistical economics," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number moore1911.
    5. Jaime Ortega, 2001. "Job Rotation as a Learning Mechanism," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 47(10), pages 1361-1370, October.
    6. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, January.
    7. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-990, October.
    8. Theodore Papageorgiou, 2014. "Learning Your Comparative Advantages," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(3), pages 1263-1295.
    9. Giuseppe Moscarini, 2005. "Job Matching and the Wage Distribution," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 481-516, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Kehrig & Nicolas Vincent, 2013. "Financial Frictions and Investment Dynamics in Multi-Plant Firms," Working Papers 13-56, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos & Kaas, Leo, 2015. "Worker mobility in a search model with adverse selection," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 340-386.
    3. Stijepic, Damir, 2015. "Job Mobility and Sorting: Theory and Evidence," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112821, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Li, Fei & Tian, Can, 2013. "Directed search and job rotation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(3), pages 1268-1281.
    5. Ueno, Yuko, 2014. "Size-specific Effects in Job Reallocation and Worker Mobility: Japan’s Experience from the 1990s," CIS Discussion paper series 624, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Li, Fei & Tian, Can, 2011. "Directed search and job rotation," MPRA Paper 33875, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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