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On the Efficiency of Nominal GDP Targeting in a Large Open Economy

Author

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  • Matthew Hoelle
  • M. Udara Peiris

Abstract

Since 2007 there have been increasing calls to abandon a regime of Stabilizing Inflation (SI) in favor of Nominal GDP (NGDP) targeting. One argument in favor of NGDP targeting is that it allows inflation to redistribute resources among bond holders efficiently. Here we examine this claim in a large open monetary economy and show that, in contrast to SI, NGDP targeting is in fact (Pareto) efficient in a world with stochastic real uncertainty, and in the absence of complete insurance markets (only nominally risk free bonds are available). However this result is ultimately fragile and breaks down once we attempt to deviate from the simplistic setting necessary for the result to hold.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Hoelle & M. Udara Peiris, 2013. "On the Efficiency of Nominal GDP Targeting in a Large Open Economy," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1273, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pur:prukra:1273
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    File URL: https://krannert.purdue.edu/programs/phd/working-papers-series/2013/1273.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peiris, M.Udara & Polemarchakis, Herakles, 2015. "Quantitative Easing in an Open Economy : Prices, Exchange Rates and Risk Premia," CRETA Online Discussion Paper Series 09, Centre for Research in Economic Theory and its Applications CRETA.
    2. Kehoe, Timothy J. & Levine, David K., 1990. "The economics of indeterminacy in overlapping generations models," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 219-243, July.
    3. Charles T. Carlstrom & Timothy S. Fuerst & Matthias Paustian, 2010. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a Model with Agency Costs," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(s1), pages 37-70, September.
    4. Kevin D. Sheedy, 2014. "Debt and Incomplete Financial Markets: A Case for Nominal GDP Targeting," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 45(1 (Spring), pages 301-373.
    5. Bai, Jinhui H. & Schwarz, Ingolf, 2006. "Monetary equilibria in a cash-in-advance economy with incomplete financial markets," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4-5), pages 422-451, August.
    6. Geanakoplos, John, 1990. "An introduction to general equilibrium with incomplete asset markets," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 1-38.
    7. Beker, Pablo & Chattopadhyay, Subir, 2010. "Consumption dynamics in general equilibrium: A characterisation when markets are incomplete," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 145(6), pages 2133-2185, November.
    8. Peiris, M. Udara & Tsomocos, Dimitrios P., 2015. "International monetary equilibrium with default," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 47-57.
    9. Zhigang Feng, 2013. "Tackling indeterminacy in overlapping generations models," Mathematical Methods of Operations Research, Springer;Gesellschaft für Operations Research (GOR);Nederlands Genootschap voor Besliskunde (NGB), vol. 77(3), pages 445-457, June.
    10. Gaetano Bloise & Herakles Polemarchakis, 2006. "Theory and practice of monetary policy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 27(1), pages 1-23, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Hoelle, 2014. "Quantitative Easing under Incomplete Markets: Optimality Conditions for Stationary Policy," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1277, Purdue University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; open economy; uncertainty; incomplete markets; Pareto efficiency.;

    JEL classification:

    • D50 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - General
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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