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Do old and new labour market risks overlap? Automation, offshorability, and non-standard employment

Author

Listed:
  • Malo, Miguel
  • Cueto, Begoña

Abstract

This article analyses whether automation and offshorability risks overlap with non-standard employment. The research uses data from Spain, as this is a country with one of the highest temporary employment rates across the world since the 1990s. In general, the analysis shows that automation risks affect slightly more to those with non-standard work arrangements. However, higher educational level is crucial to be much less exposed to automation risks, irrespective of the type of contract or the working time. The offshorability risk also has a small overlap with non-standard employment, but has the opposite relationship with the educational level. The results suggest that specific training policies attending to those with lower educational levels in non-standard employment would be advisable to protect some workers against automation risks, but not against offshorability.

Suggested Citation

  • Malo, Miguel & Cueto, Begoña, 2019. "Do old and new labour market risks overlap? Automation, offshorability, and non-standard employment," MPRA Paper 95058, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:95058
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/95058/1/MPRA_paper_95058.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Baumgarten, Daniel & Geishecker, Ingo & Görg, Holger, 2013. "Offshoring, tasks, and the skill-wage pattern," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 132-152.
    2. David Autor & Anna Salomons, 2018. "Is Automation Labor-Displacing? Productivity Growth, Employment, and the Labor Share," NBER Working Papers 24871, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Alan S. Blinder, 2009. "How Many US Jobs Might be Offshorable?," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 10(2), pages 41-78, April.
    4. Elva López Mourelo & Miguel Ángel Malo, 2015. "El mercado de trabajo en España: el contexto europeo, los dos viejos desafíos y un nuevo problema," EKONOMIAZ. Revista vasca de Economía, Gobierno Vasco / Eusko Jaurlaritza / Basque Government, vol. 87(01), pages 32-59.
    5. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    6. Schmidpeter, Bernhard & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2018. "How do Automation and Offshorability Influence Unemployment Duration and Subsequent Job Quality?," Economics Series 343, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    7. Frey, Carl Benedikt & Osborne, Michael A., 2017. "The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 254-280.
    8. Cecilia Albert & Carlos García-Serrano & Virginia Hernanz, 2004. "Firm-provided training and temporary contracts," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 67-88, January.
    9. repec:eee:ecolet:v:159:y:2017:i:c:p:157-160 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Hongshik Lee & Joonhyung Lee, 2015. "The impact of offshoring on temporary workers: evidence on wages from South Korea," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(3), pages 555-587, August.
    11. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Miguel Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2008. "The Role of Temporary Help Agency Employment on Temp-to-Perm Transitions," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 138-161, June.
    12. De Groen, Willem Pieter & Maselli, Ilaria, 2016. "The Impact of the Collaborative Economy on the Labour Market," CEPS Papers 11625, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    13. Pouliakas, Konstantinos, 2018. "Determinants of Automation Risk in the EU Labour Market: A Skills-Needs Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11829, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Zoe Adams & Simon Deakin, 2014. "Institutional Solutions to Precariousness & Inequality in Labour Markets," Working Papers wp463, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    15. Alan S. Blinder & Alan B. Krueger, 2013. "Alternative Measures of Offshorability: A Survey Approach," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(S1), pages 97-128.
    16. repec:bin:bpeajo:v:49:y:2019:i:2018-01:p:1-87 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Zoe Adams & Simon Deakin, 2014. "Institutional Solutions to Precariousness and Inequality in Labour Markets," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(4), pages 779-809, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Automation; offshorability; temporary contracts; standard employment relationship;

    JEL classification:

    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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