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Behavioral Aspects of Organizational Learning and Adaptation

  • Chatterjee, Sidharta

In this paper, I seek to understand the behavioral basis of higher organizational learning and adaption as a teleological dynamic equilibrium process to decipher the underlying psycho-physiological aspects of individual cognitive learning related to organizational adaption. Dynamics of cognitive learning has some differential paths within the neural circuitry which follows certain patterns that leads to individual as well as organized evolution in course of a learning process. I undertake a comparative analysis of human cognitive and behavioral changes and the active mechanisms underlying animal behavior and learning processes to understand the differential patterns of these adaptive changes in these two species. Cognitive behavioral learning processes have certain economic perspectives which help an individual to attain efficiency in workplace adaptation and in learning which however, the individual when being part of an alliance, ember positive influence on the society or organization as a whole. Comparatively, in primates, I review some empirical evidences drawn from chronological studies about cognitive behavioral learning process and adaptation as well as the presence of the capacity of making attributions about mental states, which exists in rudimentary form in chimpanzees and apes. Following this, I apply the outcomes of the findings on different aspects of human cognitive and adaptive behavioral learning-induced evolutionary changes and how human beings are able to exploit the presence of these additive advantages under cluster settings.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 27365.

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Date of creation: 05 Dec 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27365
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  1. Edward P. Lazear, 1996. "Performance Pay and Productivity," NBER Working Papers 5672, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Imran Rasul & Iwan Barankay & Orana Bandiera, 2005. "Social preferences and the response to incentives: Evidence from personnel data," Natural Field Experiments 00212, The Field Experiments Website.
  3. David Cayla, 2008. "Organizational Learning: A Process Between Equilibrium and Evolution," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00267975, HAL.
  4. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00267975 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Pierre Garrouste, 1999. "Apprentissage, interactions, et création de connaissance," Revue d'Économie Industrielle, Programme National Persée, vol. 88(1), pages 137-151.
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