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Government spending multipliers in contraction and expansion

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  • Walid Qazizada
  • Engelbert Stockhammer

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of government spending on output and the size of the spending multiplier during periods of output contraction vs. expansion. It also investigates the impact of spending when the economy hits the nominal zero lower bound. It uses a panel of 21 advanced countries over the period of 1979-2011, applying a TSLS estimation technique. We find a spending multiplier of close to 1 during expansion and values of up to 3 during contractions. However, our results do not indicate a difference in the impact of spending during nominal zero lower bound periods.

Suggested Citation

  • Walid Qazizada & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2014. "Government spending multipliers in contraction and expansion," Working Papers PKWP1404, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
  • Handle: RePEc:pke:wpaper:pkwp1404
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Botta, Alberto & Tori, Daniele, 2017. "A critique to the expansionary austerity (part III): empirical counter facts beyond theoretical weaknesses," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 16387, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    2. repec:elg:rokejn:v:5:y:2017:i:3:p439-458 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ashima Goyal & Bhavyaa Sharma, 2015. "Government expenditure in India: Composition, cyclicality and multipliers," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2015-032, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    4. Paolo Piacentini, 2016. "The demand-side vs. the supply–side in the analysis of employment: the potentials for the use of “employment multipliers”," Working Papers 0023, ASTRIL - Associazione Studi e Ricerche Interdisciplinari sul Lavoro.
    5. Engelbert Stockhammer & collin constantine & Severin Reissl, 2016. "Explaining the Euro crisis: Current account imbalances, credit booms and economic policy in different economic paradigms," Working Papers PKWP1617, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
    6. Philipp Heimberger, 2017. "Did fiscal consolidation cause the double-dip recession in the euro area?," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 5(3), pages 439-458, July.
    7. Alberto Botta & Daniele Tori, 2015. "A critique to the expansionary austerity: Theoretical weaknesses and empirical counter evidence," Working Papers PKWP1511, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
    8. Dennis Bonam & Jakob de Haan & Beau Soederhuizen, 2017. "The effects of fiscal policy at the effective lower bound," DNB Working Papers 565, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    9. Alberto Botta, 2016. "The Short- and Long-run Inconsistency of the Expansionary Austerity Theory: A Post-Keynesian/Evolutionist Critique," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_878, Levy Economics Institute.
    10. Fabrício Pitombo Leite, 2015. "Taking Godley's Ratios Seriously," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 508-533, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal multiplier; fiscal policy; panel analysis; output contraction;

    JEL classification:

    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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