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Poverty, Vulnerability and Family Size: Evidence from the Philippines

  • Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C.

This paper shows how large family size can be an important contributor to household poverty. It presents results from recent research by the author using nationally representative household survey data that demonstrate clearly how large family size can contribute to poverty and vulnerability through its impact on household savings, labor supply, and parental earnings and education of children. The paper is the most systematic attempt to date to show the links between family size and poverty in the Philippines using household survey data. The clear implication of the results is that, in the case of the Philippines, an active population policy aimed at restricting family size could have an important impact on poverty reduction.

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File URL: http://serp-p.pids.gov.ph/serp-p/download.php?d=3723&s=3
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Paper provided by Philippine Institute for Development Studies in its series Discussion Papers with number DP 2005-19.

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Length: 23
Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2005-19
Contact details of provider: Postal: NEDA sa Makati Building, 106 Amorsolo St., Legaspi Village, Makati City,
Web page: http://www.pids.gov.ph/Email:


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  1. Ruperto P. Alonzo, et al, 2004. "Population and Poverty : The Real Score," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200415, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
  2. Ethan Ligon & Laura Schechter, 2003. "Measuring Vulnerability," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages C95-C102, March.
  3. Jungmin Lee, 2008. "Sibling size and investment in children’s education: an asian instrument," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 855-875, October.
  4. Joshua D. Angrist & Guido W. Imbens, 1995. "Identification and Estimation of Local Average Treatment Effects," NBER Technical Working Papers 0118, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Peter J. Glick & Alessandra Marini & David E. Sahn, 2007. "Estimating the Consequences of Unintended Fertility for Child Health and Education in Romania: An Analysis Using Twins Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(5), pages 667-691, October.
  6. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1980. "Testing the Quantity-Quality Fertility Model: The Use of Twins as a Natural Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 227-40, January.
  7. Stefan Dercon (QEH), . "Vulnerability: a micro perspective," QEH Working Papers qehwps149, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
  8. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-77, June.
  9. Arsenio M. Balisacan & Ernesto M. Pernia, 2001. "Probing Beneath Cross-National Averages: Poverty, Inequality, and Growth in the Philippines," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200111, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
  10. Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C., 2002. "Population and Poverty: A Review of the Links, Evidence and Implications for the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2002-21, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
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