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Estimating the Consequences of Unintended Fertility for Child Health and Education in Romania: An Analysis Using Twins Data

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  • Peter J. Glick
  • Alessandra Marini
  • David E. Sahn

Abstract

We use the natural experiment of twins at first birth to estimate the effects of unplanned fertility on the nutritional status and school enrolment of children in Romania, a country with a unique fertility history. A first-birth twins shock has negative impacts on children's human capital investments, particularly for later-born siblings. We infer that harsh pronatalist policies prior to the 1989 Revolution had adverse consequences for the human capital of Romanian children, and that policies to make fertility control easier will have significant positive impacts on children's health and schooling. Copyright 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Peter J. Glick & Alessandra Marini & David E. Sahn, 2007. "Estimating the Consequences of Unintended Fertility for Child Health and Education in Romania: An Analysis Using Twins Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(5), pages 667-691, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:69:y:2007:i:5:p:667-691
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jungmin Lee, 2008. "Sibling size and investment in children’s education: an asian instrument," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 855-875, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aniceto C. Orbeta, 2006. "Poverty, Vulnerability and Family Size: Evidence from the Philippines," Chapters,in: Poverty Strategies in Asia, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Orbeta, Aniceto Jr. C., 2006. "Children and Household Savings in the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2006-14, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    3. Adriana D. Kugler & Santosh Kumar, 2017. "Preference for Boys, Family Size, and Educational Attainment in India," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(3), pages 835-859, June.
    4. Aniceto C. Orbeta Jr., 2009. "Number of children and their education in Philippine households," Philippine Review of Economics, University of the Philippines School of Economics and Philippine Economic Society, vol. 46(2), pages 123-154, December.
    5. Datar, Ashlesha, 2017. "The more the heavier? Family size and childhood obesity in the U.S," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 143-151.
    6. Bagger, Jesper & Birchenall, Javier A. & Mansour, Hani & Urzua, Sergio, 2013. "Education, Birth Order, and Family Size," IZA Discussion Papers 7454, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Kumar, Santosh & Kugler, Adriana, 2011. "Testing the Children Quantity-Quality Trade-Off in India," MPRA Paper 42487, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Xavier de Luna & Anneli Ivarsson, 2016. "Does the number of siblings affect health in midlife? Evidence from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(43), pages 1259-1302, November.

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