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Family Size, Household Shocks and Chronic and Transient Poverty in the Philippine Households

Author

Listed:
  • Bayudan-Dacuycuy, Connie
  • Lim, Joseph Anthony

Abstract

Using panel data, this paper attempts to analyze the chronic and transient poverty in the Philippines. Results indicate that chronic poverty is the more substantial portion of the Philippine poverty with rural households and households in the Mindanao region as the more afflicted areas. This paper finds that both chronic and transient poverty are affected by negative shocks but negative labor market shocks affect chronic poverty while natural disasters affect transient poverty. Results also indicate that the number of dependent children positively affects chronic poverty but not transient poverty. Policies to lower both types of poverty in the Philippine context are suggested.

Suggested Citation

  • Bayudan-Dacuycuy, Connie & Lim, Joseph Anthony, 2013. "Family Size, Household Shocks and Chronic and Transient Poverty in the Philippine Households," MPRA Paper 64739, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:64739
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/64739/1/MPRA_paper_64739.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neil McCulloch & Bob Baulch, 2000. "Simulating the impact of policy upon chronic and transitory poverty in rural Pakistan," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 100-130.
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    4. Aniceto C. Orbeta, 2006. "Poverty, Vulnerability and Family Size: Evidence from the Philippines," Chapters,in: Poverty Strategies in Asia, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Lillard, Lee A & Willis, Robert J, 1978. "Dynamic Aspects of Earning Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 985-1012, September.
    6. Balisacan, Arsenio M. & Hill, Hal (ed.), 2003. "The Philippine Economy: Development, Policies, and Challenges," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195158984.
    7. Francesco Devicienti, 2011. "Estimating poverty persistence in Britain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 657-686, May.
    8. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-766, May.
    9. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
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    11. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Is transient poverty different? Evidence for rural China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 82-99.
    12. Haddad, Lawrence & Ahmed, Akhter, 2003. "Chronic and Transitory Poverty: Evidence from Egypt, 1997-99," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 71-85, January.
    13. Ross Finnie & Arthur Sweetman, 2003. "Poverty dynamics: empirical evidence for Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(2), pages 291-325, May.
    14. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4977 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Transient Poverty in Postreform Rural China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 338-357, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1419-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:bla:rdevec:v:22:y:2018:i:2:p:736-765 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Rio Yonson & Ilan Noy & JC Gaillard, 2018. "The measurement of disaster risk: An example from tropical cyclones in the Philippines," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 736-765, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    chronic poverty; transient poverty; components approach; quantile regression; Philippines; Asia;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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