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Poverty Dynamics of Households in Rural China: Identifying Multiple Pathways for Poverty Transition

  • Katsushi Imai
  • Jin You

The objective of our study is to identify pattern and causes of households' transitions in and out of poverty using the long household panel data on rural China in the period 1989-2009. We propose a discrete-time multi-spell duration model that not only corrects for correlated unobserved heterogeneity across transitions and various destinations within the transition, but also addresses the endogeneity due to dynamic selection associated with household's livelihood strategies. Duration dependence is generally found to be negative for both poverty exit and re-entry. The household who chose either farming or out-migration as a main livelihood strategy was more likely to escape from this persistent poverty than those who took local non-agricultural employment, while the role of social protection, such as health insurance, was not universally good for alleviating chronic poverty. Overall, the present study emphasises the central role of agriculture in helping the chronically poor escape from poverty.

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File URL: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/economics/discussionpapers/EDP-1203.pdf
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Paper provided by Economics, The University of Manchester in its series The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series with number 1203.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:man:sespap:1203
Contact details of provider: Postal: Manchester M13 9PL
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Web page: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/economics/

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