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The Financial Connectedness between Eurozone Core and Periphery: A Disaggregated View

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  • Georgios Magkonis

    (University of Portsmouth)

  • Andreas Tsopanakis

    (Cardiff University)

Abstract

This paper examines the financial stress interconnectedness among GIIPS economies and Germany. Based on market level financial stress indices, it examines the stress transmission process as well as the causal network relationships in banking sector, bond, money and stock markets. The period under investigation, 2001†2013, allows to test the effects of financial crisis of 2008 as well as the subsequent European sovereign crisis. Using two alternative techniques for connectedness analysis, our evidence suggests that the peripheral economies of Italy and Spain play a highly significant role in the stress transmission in all markets, especially in the cases of banks and equity markets. Moreover, we visualize our results using network analysis. Contrary to common wisdom, Portugal, Ireland, and mainly Greece, do not seem to have an important role in amplifying stress levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgios Magkonis & Andreas Tsopanakis, 2018. "The Financial Connectedness between Eurozone Core and Periphery: A Disaggregated View," Working Papers in Economics & Finance 2018-03, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth Business School, Economics and Finance Subject Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:pbs:ecofin:2018-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Camelia Minoiu & Chanhyun Kang & V.S. Subrahmanian & Anamaria Berea, 2015. "Does financial connectedness predict crises?," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 607-624, April.
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    3. Eichengreen, Barry & Mody, Ashoka & Nedeljkovic, Milan & Sarno, Lucio, 2012. "How the Subprime Crisis went global: Evidence from bank credit default swap spreads," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 1299-1318.
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    5. Jung, R.C. & Maderitsch, R., 2014. "Structural breaks in volatility spillovers between international financial markets: Contagion or mere interdependence?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 331-342.
    6. Romero-Meza, Rafael & Bonilla, Claudio & Benedetti, Hugo & Serletis, Apostolos, 2015. "Nonlinearities and financial contagion in Latin American stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 653-656.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Eurozone; stress transmission; connectedness analysis; spillovers; networks;

    JEL classification:

    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General

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