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Knowledge-Driven Economic Development

  • Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

This paper examines the impact of mass media and information and communications technologies (ICT) as knowledge-based infrastructures on economic development. The results strongly suggest that both mass media and ICT penetration are negatively associated with corruption. This result holds across both the entire sample (of both developed and developing countries), and only for developing countries. The same result is also obtained for the effects of ICT and mass media on economic inequality. However, ICT reveals itself inequality increasing for the developing country sample but inequality decreasing for the entire sample. Finally, lower poverty is robustly associated with higher media (newspaper circulation) penetration.

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File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/working_papers/paper267.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 267.

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Date of creation: 01 Jun 2006
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:267
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  18. Paolo Mauro, 1996. "The Effects of Corruptionon Growth, Investment, and Government Expenditure," IMF Working Papers 96/98, International Monetary Fund.
  19. Besley, Timothy & McLaren, John, 1993. "Taxes and Bribery: The Role of Wage Incentives," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(416), pages 119-41, January.
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