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Economic analysis on the socioeconomic determinants of child malnutrition in Lao PDR

Author

Listed:
  • Yusuke Kamiya

    (Ph.D candidate, Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP),Osaka University)

Abstract

The prevalence of stunting and underweight among Lao children is amongst the highest in the region. This paper provides a theoretical framework which integrates the mechanism of child malnutrition and a household decision-making behaviour and investigates the relationship between socioeconomic factors and child health outcomes. Using the Lao Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 3 dataset, it reveals that mother fs age and education level, ethnicity, household assets and community factors such as water, sanitation and communication infrastructure have a statistically significant impact on child nutritional status. The unobserved heterogeneities of both household and community are also found to be associated with child nutrition production.

Suggested Citation

  • Yusuke Kamiya, 2009. "Economic analysis on the socioeconomic determinants of child malnutrition in Lao PDR," OSIPP Discussion Paper 09E007, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:09e007
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    File URL: http://www.osipp.osaka-u.ac.jp/archives/DP/2009/DP2009E007.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zewdie, Tadiwos & Abebaw, Degnet, 0. "Determinants of Child Malnutrition: Empirical Evidence from Kombolcha District of Eastern Hararghe Zone, Ethiopia," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 52.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child malnutrition; Anthropometrics; Stunting; Wasting; Underweight; Social determinants of health; Millennium Development Goal (MDG); Health policies; Lao PDR (Laos);

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy

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