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Education, experience and dynamic urban wage premium

Author

Listed:
  • Fredrik Carlsen

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Jorn Rattso

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Hildegunn E. Stokke

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

We analyze static and dynamic agglomeration effects across education groups. The data are based on administrative registers covering all full time workers in the private sector of Norway during 2001-2010, about 6.5 million worker-year observations, including place and sector of work experience since 1993. Accounting for unobservable abilities with identification based on movers, the static urban wage premium is similar across education groups. When the history of work experience in different regions and sectors is included, we show that the dynamic wage premium increases in education level and that highly educated in high wage sectors have the largest learning advantage.

Suggested Citation

  • Fredrik Carlsen & Jorn Rattso & Hildegunn E. Stokke, 2013. "Education, experience and dynamic urban wage premium," Working Paper Series 15213, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:15213
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    File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2013/14_edu_JR_FC_HES.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Gobillon, Laurent, 2015. "The Empirics of Agglomeration Economies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    2. Ana Maria Bonomi Barufi, 2016. "Should I Stay Or Should I Go? Dynamic Agglomeration Economies In Brazil," Anais do XLIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 43rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 164, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    3. D'Costa, Sabine & Overman, Henry G., 2014. "The urban wage growth premium: Sorting or learning?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 168-179.
    4. Stefan Leknes, 2014. "Quality of life and population size: Causal evidence with historical mines," Working Paper Series 15714, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    5. repec:kap:itaxpf:v:24:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10797-016-9430-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Vives Coscojuela, Cecilia, 2016. "Human Capital and Market Size," IKERLANAK Ikerlanak;2016-98, Universidad del País Vasco - Departamento de Fundamentos del Análisis Económico I.
    7. Mario Chacon & James A. Robinson & Ragnar Torvik, 2006. "When is Democracy an Equilibrium?: Theory and Evidence from Colombia's "La Violencia"," NBER Working Papers 12789, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Hildegunn Stokke & Jørn Rattsø, 2015. "National Income Taxation and the Geographic Distribution of Population," ERSA conference papers ersa15p305, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agglomeration economies; sorting; education; worker experience;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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