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Measuring Winners and Losers from the new I-35W Mississippi River Bridge

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Abstract

The opening of the replacement for the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge on September 18th, 2008 provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the impacts generated by this additional link on network performance. Using detailed GPS data to estimate travel times on links and for origin-destination pairs, this research finds that while on average travel time improved with the reopening of the bridge, the subsequent restoration of parts of the rest of the network to their pre-collapse configuration worsened travel times significantly on average. In all cases, the distribution of winners and losers indicates clear spatial patterns associated with these network changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Shanjiang Zhu & David Levinson & Henry Liu, 2009. "Measuring Winners and Losers from the new I-35W Mississippi River Bridge," Working Papers 000066, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:i-35w-trb2010-measuringwinnerslosers
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/180067
    File Function: First version, 2009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shanjiang Zhu & David Levinson, 2011. "A Portfolio Theory of Route Choice," Working Papers 000096, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    2. Shanjiang Zhu & David Levinson, 2011. "The Hierarchy of Roads, the Locality of Traffic, and Governance," Working Papers 000097, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Network disruption; Travel time; GPS data;

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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