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Decomposing Productivity Growth in the U.S. Computer Industry

  • Hyunbae Chun
  • M. Ishaq Nadiri

In this paper, we examine the sources of the productivity growth in the U.S. computer industry from 1978 to 1999. We estimate a joint production model of output quantity and quality that distinguishes two types of technological changes: process and product innovations. Based on the estimation results, we decompose total factor productivity (TFP) growth rate into the contributions of process and product innovations and scale economies. The results show that product innovation associated with better quality accounts for about 30 percent of the TFP growth in the computer industry. Furthermore, we find that the TFP acceleration in the computer industry in the late 1990s is mainly derived from a rapid increase in product innovation.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w9267.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9267.

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Date of creation: Oct 2002
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Publication status: published as Hyunbae Chun & M. Ishaq Nadiri, 2008. "Decomposing Productivity Growth in the U.S. Computer Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 174-180, November.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9267
Note: PR
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  1. Karl Whelan, 2002. "Computers, Obsolescence, And Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 445-461, August.
  2. Darren Filson, 2001. "The Nature and Effects of Technological Change over the Industry Life Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(2), pages 460-494, July.
  3. Hendel, Igal, 1999. "Estimating Multiple-Discrete Choice Models: An Application to Computerization Returns," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(2), pages 423-46, April.
  4. M. Ishaq Nadiri & Banani Nandi, 1999. "Technical Change, Markup, Divestiture, And Productivity Growth In The U.S. Telecommunications Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 488-498, August.
  5. Bart Hobijn, 2001. "Is equipment price deflation a statistical artifact?," Staff Reports 139, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
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  7. Stavins, Joanna, 1997. "Estimating demand elasticities in a differentiated product industry: The personal computer market," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 347-367.
  8. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 562-83, June.
  9. Eric J. Bartelsman & Wayne Gray, 1996. "The NBER Manufacturing Productivity Database," NBER Technical Working Papers 0205, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Gort, Michael & Klepper, Steven, 1982. "Time Paths in the Diffusion of Product Innovations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(367), pages 630-53, September.
  11. Stavins, Joanna, 1995. "Model Entry and Exit in a Differentiated-Product Industry: The Personal Computer Market," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(4), pages 571-84, November.
  12. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Shane Greenstein, 1997. "Technological Competition and the Structure of the Computer Industry," Working Papers 97028, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  13. Kremer, Michael, 1993. "The O-Ring Theory of Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(3), pages 551-75, August.
  14. Charles R. Hulten & Edwin R. Dean & Michael J. Harper, 2001. "New Developments in Productivity Analysis," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number hult01-1.
  15. repec:ucn:oapubs:10197/204 is not listed on IDEAS
  16. Peter Thompson & Doug Waldo, 2000. "Process Versus Product Innovation: Do Consumption Data Contain Any Information?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(1), pages 155-170, July.
  17. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
  18. Irwin, Douglas A & Klenow, Peter J, 1994. "Learning-by-Doing Spillovers in the Semiconductor Industry," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1200-1227, December.
  19. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: US Economic Growth in the Information Age," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 261, OECD Publishing.
  20. Davis, Peter, 2000. "Empirical models of demand for differentiated products," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(4-6), pages 993-1005, May.
  21. Ohta, Makoto, 1975. "Production Technologies of the U.S. Boiler and Turbogenerator Industries and Hedonic Price Indexes for Their Products: A Cost-Function Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(1), pages 1-26, February.
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