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Oil Prices, Exhaustible Resources, and Economic Growth

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  • James D. Hamilton

Abstract

This paper explores details behind the phenomenal increase in global crude oil production over the last century and a half and the implications if that trend should be reversed. I document that a key feature of the growth in production has been exploitation of new geographic areas rather than application of better technology to existing sources, and suggest that the end of that era could come soon. The economic dislocations that historically followed temporary oil supply disruptions are reviewed, and the possible implications of that experience for what the transition era could look like are explored.

Suggested Citation

  • James D. Hamilton, 2012. "Oil Prices, Exhaustible Resources, and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 17759, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17759
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    Cited by:

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    2. Kallis, Giorgos & Sager, Jalel, 2017. "Oil and the economy: A systematic review of the literature for ecological economists," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 561-571.
    3. Hodula Martin & Vahalík Bohdan, 2017. "Effects of oil shocks on EMU exports: technological level differences," Review of Economic Perspectives, Sciendo, vol. 17(4), pages 399-423, December.
    4. Chai, Jian & Lu, Quanying & Hu, Yi & Wang, Shouyang & Lai, Kin Keung & Liu, Hongtao, 2018. "Analysis and Bayes statistical probability inference of crude oil price change point," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 271-283.
    5. Casey, Gregory, "undated". "Energy Efficiency and Directed Technical Change: Implications for Climate Change Mitigation," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 259959, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Svetlana Aleksandrova, 2016. "Impact of Oil Prices on Oil Exporting Countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 4, pages 447-460, December.
    7. Wolfgang Pollan, 2013. "US Inflation and Crude Oil Prices. An International Perspective," WIFO Working Papers 451, WIFO.
    8. Johannes Pfeiffer, 2017. "Fossil Resources and Climate Change – The Green Paradox and Resource Market Power Revisited in General Equilibrium," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 77, December.
    9. Renato Agurto & Fernando Fuentes & Carlos Garcia & Esteban Skoknic, 2013. "Power Generation and the Business Cycle: The Impact of Delaying Investment," ILADES-UAH Working Papers inv290, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Business.
    10. Yu, Jia-Wei & Xie, Wen-Jie & Jiang, Zhi-Qiang, 2018. "Early warning model based on correlated networks in global crude oil markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 490(C), pages 1335-1343.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • Q30 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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