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Media, Institutions, and Government Action: Prevention vs. Palliation in the Time of Cholera

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  • Chongwoo Choe
  • Paul A. Raschky

Abstract

This paper studies how media and the quality of institutions affect government action taken before and after a natural disaster. The key elements in this relationship are the media's role as the provider of information to voters about government action, the quality of democracy that pertains to how relevant election results are, and corruption that reduces the efficacy of government action. Provided that more media activity is focused on post-disaster government action, we show that more media activity and more democratic institutions both contribute positively to the government's palliative effort after the disaster, although corruption has a negative effect that decreases as media activity increases. On the preventive effort before the disaster, however, media and democracy both have a negative effect, as does corruption. We provide empirical evidence based on major cholera epidemics around the world, which lends some support to these hypotheses.

Suggested Citation

  • Chongwoo Choe & Paul A. Raschky, 2011. "Media, Institutions, and Government Action: Prevention vs. Palliation in the Time of Cholera," Monash Economics Working Papers 23-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2011-23
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Media; democracy; corruption; government action; natural disaster;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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