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Polluting Politics

Author

Listed:
  • Louis-Philippe Beland
  • Vincent Boucher

Abstract

This paper estimates the causal impact of party affiliation (Republican or Democrat) of U.S. governors on pollution. Using a regression discontinuity design, gubernatorial election data, and air quality data from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we find that pollution is lower under Democratic governors. We identify that this is mostly due to environmental policies enacted by Democratic governors.

Suggested Citation

  • Louis-Philippe Beland & Vincent Boucher, 2015. "Polluting Politics," Cahiers de recherche 1513, CIRPEE.
  • Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:1513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:pubcho:v:174:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0491-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    3. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:982-995 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:envpol:v:21:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s10018-018-0226-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:jeborg:v:143:y:2017:i:c:p:58-77 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Niklas Potrafke, 2017. "Government Ideology and Economic Policy-Making in the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 6444, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Matthew Doyle & Corrado Di Maria & Ian A. Lange & Emiliya Lazarova, 2016. "Electoral Incentives and Firm Behavior: Evidence from U.S. Power Plant Pollution Abatement," CESifo Working Paper Series 6127, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political Parties; Pollution; Air Quality; Regression Discontinuity;

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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