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When Prime Depositors Run on the Banks: A Behavioral Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Natanael Waraney Gerald Massie

    (University of Indonesia)

  • Chaikal Nuryakin

    (Researcher, Institute for Economic and Social Research, Faculty of Economics, University of Indonesia, Jakarta)

Abstract

This study aims to observe the relationship between withdrawal decisions and individual psychological aspects, namely time and risk preferences. Our sample is a pool of prime depositors in Indonesia, mainly due to the country’s deposit market being heavily concentrated on such depositors. We describe the elicited risk preferences of the aforementioned depositors, along with their preferences on how long they would keep their money deposited. We discuss relationships between their withdrawal decision, which in excessive amount could cause bank run situations, with risk and time preferences under idiosyncratic economic shocks. A cascade effect simulation is also included in our analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Natanael Waraney Gerald Massie & Chaikal Nuryakin, 2017. "When Prime Depositors Run on the Banks: A Behavioral Approach," LPEM FEBUI Working Papers 201712, LPEM, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, revised Sep 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:lpe:wpaper:201712
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chaikal Nuryakin & Natanael Waraney Gerald Massie, 2018. "Does Deposit Insurance Matter? Behavioral Evidence from Indonesia," LPEM FEBUI Working Papers 201827, LPEM, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, revised 2018.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Withdrawal Decision — Time Preference — Risk Preference — Bank Run — Prime Depositor;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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