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Panic bank runs

Author

Listed:
  • Hubert Janos Kiss

    () (Institute of Economics, Research Centre for Economic and Regional Studies and Eötvös Loránd University)

  • Ismael Rodriguez-Lara

    () (Middlesex University London, Department of Economics, Business School)

  • Alfonso Rosa-Garcia

    () (Universidad Catolica de Murcia, Facultad de Ciencias Juridicas y de la Empresa)

Abstract

We provide experimental evidence that panic bank runs occur in the absence of problems with fundamentals and coordination failures among depositors, the two main culprits identified in the literature. Depositors withdraw when they observe that others do so, even when theoretically they should not. Our findings suggest that panic also manifests itself in the beliefs of depositors, who overestimate the probability that a bank run is underway. Loss-aversion has a predictive power on panic behavior, while risk or ambiguity aversion do not.

Suggested Citation

  • Hubert Janos Kiss & Ismael Rodriguez-Lara & Alfonso Rosa-Garcia, 2017. "Panic bank runs," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1710, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:1710
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Douglas D. Davis & Robert J. Reilly, 2016. "On Freezing Depositor Funds at Financially Distressed Banks: An Experimental Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(5), pages 989-1017, August.
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    3. Garratt, Rod & Keister, Todd, 2009. "Bank runs as coordination failures: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 300-317, August.
    4. Martin Dufwenberg, 2015. "Banking on experiments?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(6), pages 943-971, November.
    5. Kiss, Hubert Janos & Rodriguez-Lara, Ismael & Rosa-García, Alfonso, 2014. "Do social networks prevent or promote bank runs?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 87-99.
    6. Trautmann, Stefan T. & Vlahu, Razvan, 2013. "Strategic loan defaults and coordination: An experimental analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 747-760.
    7. Chakravarty, Surajeet & Fonseca, Miguel A. & Kaplan, Todd R., 2014. "An experiment on the causes of bank run contagions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 39-51.
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    9. Yehning Chen & Iftekhar Hasan, 2008. "Why Do Bank Runs Look Like Panic? A New Explanation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(2-3), pages 535-546, March.
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    12. Martha A. Starr & Rasim Yilmaz, 2007. "Bank Runs in Emerging-Market Economies: Evidence from Turkey's Special Finance Houses," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 1112-1132, April.
    13. Huberto M. Ennis & Todd Keister, 2010. "On the fundamental reasons for bank fragility," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 1Q, pages 33-58.
    14. Brown, Martin & Trautmann, Stefan T. & Vlahu, Razvan, 2014. "Understanding bank-run contagion," Working Paper Series 1711, European Central Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:expeco:v:22:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s10683-018-9584-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hubert Janos Kiss & Ismael Rodriguez-Lara & Alfonso Rosa-Garcia, 2018. "Who runs first to the bank?," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1826, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank runs; beliefs; panic; coordination; observability; loss aversion;

    JEL classification:

    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory
    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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