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Sequential decisions in the Diamond-Dybvig banking model

Author

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  • Markus Kinateder

    () (Departamento de Econom¡a, Edificio de Amigos, Universidad de Navarra)

  • Hubert Janos Kiss

    () (Game Theory Research Group, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of SciencesAuthor-Name: Hubert J nos Kiss)

Abstract

We study the Diamond-Dybvig model of financial intermediation (JPE, 1983) under the assumption that depositors have information about previous decisions. Depositors decide sequentially whether to withdraw their funds or continue holding them in the bank. If depositors observe the history of all previous decisions, we show that there are no bank runs in equilibrium independently of whether the realized type vector selected by nature is of perfect or imperfect information.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus Kinateder & Hubert Janos Kiss, 2013. "Sequential decisions in the Diamond-Dybvig banking model," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1345, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:1345
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kiss, H.J. & Rodriguez-Lara, I. & Rosa-García, A., 2016. "Think twice before running! Bank runs and cognitive abilities," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 12-19.
    2. Gergely Horváth & Hubert János Kiss, 2014. "Correlated observations, the law of small numbers and bank runs," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1429, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank Run; Imperfect Information; Perfect Bayesian Equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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