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A Bank Run in a Classroom: Do Smart Depositors Withdraw on Time?

Author

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  • Maria Semenova

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

This paper discusses whether being smart makes depositors less prone to get involved in a panic bank run. We conduct a series of experiments with undergraduate and graduate students from Moscow and Saint-Petersburg, modelling the a-la Diamond-Dybvig deposit market with liquidity shocks, changing macroeconomic conditions and risk-based investment technologies. Our results suggest that withdrawing on time is profitable, as the average returns of depositor investments are higher, especially if the other depositors in the bank also withdraw on time. Smarter depositors – those having better academic achievements – choose the strategy of avoiding early withdrawals more frequently: each additional grade point (out of ten) adds 9 p.p. to the share of rounds where a depositor withdraws on time. This result adds to the evidence that financial literacy – even measured in a very simple way – may prevent a coordination failure in the deposit market. Our results also suggest that panic withdrawals are more probable in markets with poorer economic conditions (liquidity shocks, less profitable or less liquid investments, costly financial information), but depositors show weak sensitivity to the risks of bank investments. Depositors of medium-sized banks withdraw on time more frequently compared to those in small or large banks

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Semenova, 2018. "A Bank Run in a Classroom: Do Smart Depositors Withdraw on Time?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 64/FE/2018, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:64/fe/2018
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    File URL: https://wp.hse.ru/data/2018/01/26/1163238893/64FE2018.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks run; Experiment; Financial literacy; Academic achievements;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G41 - Financial Economics - - Behavioral Finance - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making in Financial Markets
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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